indefenseofart:

Art History remixed— Cuban-American artist Cesar Santos’s painting series, “syncretism” mixes iconic work by masters from Renaissance to Modernism: including works in the style of De Kooning, van Gogh, Goya, Michelangelo, Rothko and more.


Phenomenal! indefenseofart:

Art History remixed— Cuban-American artist Cesar Santos’s painting series, “syncretism” mixes iconic work by masters from Renaissance to Modernism: including works in the style of De Kooning, van Gogh, Goya, Michelangelo, Rothko and more.


Phenomenal! indefenseofart:

Art History remixed— Cuban-American artist Cesar Santos’s painting series, “syncretism” mixes iconic work by masters from Renaissance to Modernism: including works in the style of De Kooning, van Gogh, Goya, Michelangelo, Rothko and more.


Phenomenal! indefenseofart:

Art History remixed— Cuban-American artist Cesar Santos’s painting series, “syncretism” mixes iconic work by masters from Renaissance to Modernism: including works in the style of De Kooning, van Gogh, Goya, Michelangelo, Rothko and more.


Phenomenal! indefenseofart:

Art History remixed— Cuban-American artist Cesar Santos’s painting series, “syncretism” mixes iconic work by masters from Renaissance to Modernism: including works in the style of De Kooning, van Gogh, Goya, Michelangelo, Rothko and more.


Phenomenal!

indefenseofart:

Art History remixed— Cuban-American artist Cesar Santos’s painting series, “syncretism” mixes iconic work by masters from Renaissance to Modernism: including works in the style of De Kooning, van Gogh, Goya, Michelangelo, Rothko and more.

Phenomenal!

Six Versions of Blood Meridianhttp://www.shawncheng.com/bloodmeridian/
John Mejias • October 8, 2008

Blood Meridian is not a novel for the faint of heart, or those with a limited lexicon. Even for a well-read, native English speaker, McCarthy’s language is at times an awe-inspiring argot, in which paragraph after paragraph flow through the reader’s mind with the rhythm and phonetic sounding-out of a bizarro-world Jabberwocky, by way of Dante’s Inferno. Foreign languages intrude without translation, and many words are devoted to describing the flora, fauna, and geological features of the American southwest.

I would caution against reaching for the dictionary at every parsing error; it will tire your arm and you will tire of the book. Instead, go with the flow, and as the unintelligible words reappear throughout the text, you will begin to tease out the definitions using the context. Blood Meridian is a difficult, vexing, and boundlessly rewarding struggle to the peak of a literary Everest. Six Versions of Blood Meridianhttp://www.shawncheng.com/bloodmeridian/
John Mejias • October 8, 2008

Blood Meridian is not a novel for the faint of heart, or those with a limited lexicon. Even for a well-read, native English speaker, McCarthy’s language is at times an awe-inspiring argot, in which paragraph after paragraph flow through the reader’s mind with the rhythm and phonetic sounding-out of a bizarro-world Jabberwocky, by way of Dante’s Inferno. Foreign languages intrude without translation, and many words are devoted to describing the flora, fauna, and geological features of the American southwest.

I would caution against reaching for the dictionary at every parsing error; it will tire your arm and you will tire of the book. Instead, go with the flow, and as the unintelligible words reappear throughout the text, you will begin to tease out the definitions using the context. Blood Meridian is a difficult, vexing, and boundlessly rewarding struggle to the peak of a literary Everest. Six Versions of Blood Meridianhttp://www.shawncheng.com/bloodmeridian/
John Mejias • October 8, 2008

Blood Meridian is not a novel for the faint of heart, or those with a limited lexicon. Even for a well-read, native English speaker, McCarthy’s language is at times an awe-inspiring argot, in which paragraph after paragraph flow through the reader’s mind with the rhythm and phonetic sounding-out of a bizarro-world Jabberwocky, by way of Dante’s Inferno. Foreign languages intrude without translation, and many words are devoted to describing the flora, fauna, and geological features of the American southwest.

I would caution against reaching for the dictionary at every parsing error; it will tire your arm and you will tire of the book. Instead, go with the flow, and as the unintelligible words reappear throughout the text, you will begin to tease out the definitions using the context. Blood Meridian is a difficult, vexing, and boundlessly rewarding struggle to the peak of a literary Everest.

Six Versions of Blood Meridian
http://www.shawncheng.com/bloodmeridian/
John Mejias • October 8, 2008

Blood Meridian is not a novel for the faint of heart, or those with a limited lexicon. Even for a well-read, native English speaker, McCarthy’s language is at times an awe-inspiring argot, in which paragraph after paragraph flow through the reader’s mind with the rhythm and phonetic sounding-out of a bizarro-world Jabberwocky, by way of Dante’s Inferno. Foreign languages intrude without translation, and many words are devoted to describing the flora, fauna, and geological features of the American southwest.

I would caution against reaching for the dictionary at every parsing error; it will tire your arm and you will tire of the book. Instead, go with the flow, and as the unintelligible words reappear throughout the text, you will begin to tease out the definitions using the context. Blood Meridian is a difficult, vexing, and boundlessly rewarding struggle to the peak of a literary Everest.

seiungraffioinquestocielo:

Agrado: Mi chiamano Agrado, perché per tutta la vita ho sempre cercato di rendere la vita gradevole agli altri. Oltre che gradevole sono molto autentica: guardate che corpo, tutto fatto su misura! Occhi a mandorla, ottantamila. Naso, duecento, buttate nell’immondizia, perché l’anno dopo me l’hanno ridotto così con un’altra bastonata. Lo so che mi dà personalità, però se l’avessi saputo, non me lo toccavo. Continuo. Tette, due, perché non sono mica un mostro! Settanta ciascuna, però le ho già super-ammortizzate. Silicone nei…

Uomo del pubblico: Dove?

Agrado: Labbra, fronte, zigomi, fianchi e culo. Un litro sta sulle centomila, perciò fate voi il conto perché io l’ho già perso. Limatura della mandibola, settantacinquemila, depilazione definitiva col laser, perché le donne vengono dalle scimmie tanto quanto gli uomini, sessantamila a seduta, dipende da quanta barba una ha, normalmente da una a quattro sedute. Però se balli il flamenco ce ne vogliono di più, è chiaro. Bene, quello che stavo dicendo è che costa molto essere autentica, signora mia. E in questa cosa non si deve essere tirchi, perché una è più autentica, quanto più somiglia all’idea che ha sognato di se stessa.

If you have never seen this movie, you absolutely must! You could be living your life this much happier!

"The best teacher is experience and not through someone’s distorted point of view"
— Jack Kerouac, On the Road

I have been the temporary apparition
salving another, I have been his visitation, I say it
without arrogance, I have been an angel

for minutes at a time, and I have for hours
believed—without judgement, without condemnation—
that in each body, however obscured or recast,

is the divine body—common, habitable—
the way in a field of sunflowers
you can see every bloom’s

the multiple expression
of a single shining idea,
which is the face hammered into joy.

— excerpt from Mark Doty, Homo Will Not Inherit

How to Survive a Plague (2012)

This amazing documentary belongs near the top of the list of films that reveal the indomitable nature of the human spirit. To imagine these brave men and women—in the midst of a terrifying epidemic, struggling against personal illness, government bureaucracy, and social contempt and apathy—rising each day to fight again for their lives… It is stirring, humbling, shocking, and at times all three. This is one of those films that I knew would be difficult, so I avoided it for a number of months, but I can’t recommend How to Survive a Plague enough. See this film.

P. I. Tchaikovsky — Swan Lake

To my mind, Sundays seem best suited for relaxation and quiet reflection. In the spirit of this day of rest, enjoy this wonderfully athletic performance by Margot Fonteyn and Rudolf Nurejev II at the Vienna Opera. I find the fantastic footwork to be particularly pleasing.

Mark Danielewski — House of Leaves (2000)

As I continue to make my way through David Foster Wallace’s Infinite Jest, I can’t help but think how two of my favorite books, Mark Danielewski’s House of Leaves and Dave Eggers A Heartbreaking Work of Staggering Genius, must have been inspired by Wallace’s magnum opus. Even less than halfway through the tome, I am flabbergasted by the terrible, (dare I say) staggering genius of Infinite Jest.

I Am Love (2009)

I’ve probably seen this magnificent film a half dozen times. It mostly succeeds on the strength of Swinton’s powerhouse performance as the matriarch and caged bird, Emma Recchi. See it for the expressionistic soundtrack, the lush cinematography, and the food!

Mark Rothko — No.5/No.22 (1950)

This painting almost perfectly encapsulates my interior landscape this weekend. In a good way. I have so much more to say about Rothko, but I’ll leave it at that.